Top 10 Leading Causes of Death in Asia (Updated)

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Leading Causes of Death

It’s no secret that Asia has a high rate of mortality. In fact, it has the world’s second-highest mortality rate, after Africa. And if you’re looking for a region in which to invest, investing in Asia is a sound decision. So why do so many people die in Asia? There are a few leading causes of death in Asia that we would like to share with you, based on data from the World Health Organization (WHO). Stay safe out there and read on for more information about the top 10 leading causes of death in Asia!

Cancer

Cancer is the leading cause of death in Asia, according to the latest figures from the World Health Organization (WHO). Cancer accounted for more than one-third of all deaths in Asia in 2016. This is a rise from its position as the second leading cause of death in Asia in 2015.

The main drivers of this increase are high rates of cancer incidence and mortality in some countries, such as China and India, and low rates of cancer incidence and mortality in other countries, such as Indonesia. In China, for example, the incidence rate has increased by almost 50% over the past three decades, while the mortality rate has remained relatively unchanged. In India, meanwhile, the incidence rate has more than quadrupled since 1980, while the mortality rate has only grown by about 30%.

Despite these alarming trends, there are some signs that progress is being made to improve cancer care across Asia. For example, there have been significant increases in funding for cancer research over recent years. Additionally, there have been major advances in our understanding of how to treat cancer patients with successful results often being seen within a short period of time. However, much work remains to be done to reduce cancer mortality rates across Asia and to improve access to quality care for all those who need it.

Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in Asia, accounting for about 28% of all deaths. The top five diseases that contribute to heart disease in Asia are: ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Each country has its own unique risk factors for developing these diseases, so it is important to understand the statistics and trends in each region to ensure that everyone can make informed health decisions.

Some other major causes of death in Asia include: diabetes mellitus, leukemia, and tuberculosis. These diseases are common in countries with high rates of obesity and uncontrolled diabetes, as well as in those where HIV/AIDS is rampant.

Stroke

There are many different top leading causes of death in Asia, but some of the most common are heart disease, stroke, and cancer. In 2013, heart disease was the leading cause of death in Asia, accounting for almost one-third of all deaths. Stroke was second, with about a quarter of all deaths attributed to this condition. Cancer was third, causing about one-sixth of all deaths in Asia.

Kidney Disease

Kidney disease is the leading cause of death in Asia, according to a recent report from the World Health Organization. In 2012, kidney disease was responsible for 29% of all deaths in Asia. This is a significant increase from the 18% of deaths caused by kidney disease in 2005.

The main factors contributing to kidney disease are obesity and diabetes. Obesity is believed to increase the risk of developing chronic kidney diseases such as nephritis and chronic renal failure, while diabetes is also a major factor in accelerating the progression of these diseases. Other factors that contribute to kidney disease include high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and smoking.

To reduce the incidence of kidney disease and improve patient outcomes, caregivers should focus on promoting healthy lifestyle choices such as regular exercise, moderation in alcohol consumption, and a balanced diet. Additionally, they should encourage patients to get screened for chronic diseases early on so that they can receive treatment and manage their conditions effectively.

Chronic Lower Respiratory Conditions

According to the latest report from the World Health Organization (WHO), chronic lower respiratory conditions are now the leading cause of death in Asia. This is a significant change from just a few years ago, when cardiovascular diseases were the top killer in this region.

The main reasons for this shift are likely due to improvements in public health and medical care, as well as increased awareness and knowledge about chronic lower respiratory conditions. In particular, rates of tuberculosis have decreased significantly over the past few decades, which has contributed to an increase in deaths from this condition.

In addition to chronic lower respiratory conditions, other major causes of death in Asia include cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes. However, it is important to note that these figures vary significantly by country within this region. For example, while cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in Taiwan and South Korea, it is ranked fourth in India and fifth in Bangladesh.

Diarrhea and Malaria

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), diarrhea and malaria are the leading causes of death in Asia. In 2012, diarrheal diseases caused 533,000 deaths in Asia, while malaria killed 429,000 people. These figures reflect a significant increase from 2010, when diarrhea caused 474,000 deaths and malaria killed 392,000 people.

The main causes of diarrhea are waterborne viruses such as rotavirus and E. coli bacteria. Malaria is caused by parasites that live in the blood vessels of humans and other animals. The parasites spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Premature Death from Infectious Diseases

Asia is home to a large population of people who are vulnerable to infectious diseases. Infectious diseases can be deadly, and can cause premature death in those who are infected. Here are the five leading causes of death in Asia according to the latest global health estimates: heart disease, cancer, respiratory infections, stroke and infectious diseases.

Heart disease is the primary cause of death in Asia, accounting for 27% of all deaths in the region. This is largely due to the high rates of obesity and diabetes in Asian populations, which increases the risk of heart disease. Cancer is also a major cause of death in Asia, with an estimated 46% of all deaths attributable to this disease. The highest rates of cancer incidence and mortality are found in China and India, respectively.

Respiratory infections are the second most common cause of death in Asia, responsible for 23% of all deaths. This is largely due to the high rate of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is caused by respiratory infections. Stroke is also a major cause of death in Asia, accounting for 17% of all deaths. This is largely due to the high rates of hypertension and atherosclerosis, which increase the risk of stroke.

Influenza (flu) accounts for 14% of all deaths in Asia each year, making it one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It has caused widespread pandemics throughout history, including an outbreak that killed up to 500

Suicide and Homicide

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), suicide is the 10th leading cause of death globally, and the fourth leading cause of death in Asia. Suicide mortality rates vary greatly across different parts of Asia, with a higher rate observed in South-east Asia. In 2016, suicide was the seventh leading cause of death for men and the tenth for women in South-east Asia. In India, suicide was the third leading cause of death for men and fourth for women in 2016.

In 2012, there were an estimated 1.2 million suicides worldwide. Of these suicides, 86% were male and 14% were female. In most cases, suicide is caused by a combination of mental disorder and substance abuse. However, there has been a recent increase in cases where people commit suicide due to economic problems or due to relationship problems.

The top ten causes of death according to WHO are: cardiovascular disease; cancer; chronic lung diseases; cerebrovascular diseases; Diabetes Mellitus; influenza and pneumonia; ischaemic heart disease; leukaemia; mental disorders (except alcohol use); and lower respiratory infections.

Accidental Deaths

According to data from the World Health Organization (WHO), Asia is home to a majority of the world’s population with an Accidental Death Rate (ADR) of 6.2 per 100,000 people in 2013. The most prevalent causes of accidental death in Asia are road traffic injuries, followed by falls and drownings.

The WHO has identified several leading causes of unintentional death globally and across different regions. Road traffic injuries remain the leading cause of death worldwide, claiming over 1.5 million lives each year – more than cancer, cardiovascular diseases and maternal mortality combined. In Asia, road traffic injuries account for nearly 50% of all deaths from unintentional causes.

Falls and drownings have also been identified as major contributors to accidental death in Asia. Each year, they claim the lives of more than 500,000 people – a figure that is set to increase as populations age and physical abilities decline. Other causes of accidental death that are prominent in Asia include suffocation from fires and exposure to chemicals or electrical shocks.

Conclusion

According to the latest report by the World Health Organization, Asia has the world’s highest death rate from coronary heart disease. The top ten leading causes of death in Asia are: ischemic heart disease, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases (CLRD), lung cancer, diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, thyroid cancer, sepsis and road traffic accidents. It is important to be aware of these risks so that we can make healthy choices for our health and well-being.